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Digital SLR Camera

 

A digital single-lens reflex camera (also called a digital SLR or DSLR) is a digital camera combining the optics and the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera with a digital imaging sensor, as opposed to photographic film. The reflex design scheme is the primary difference between a DSLR and other digital cameras. In the reflex design, light travels through the lens, then to a mirror that alternates to send the image to either the viewfinder or the image sensor.

 

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Canon EOS 70D EFS 18-135mm IS STM Kit + Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

Best Digital SLR Camera

Both the sensor and processor function together to make well-detailed, clear imagery that exhibits organic tonality and color gradations with minimal noise when working in difficult lighting circumstances. The processor also delivers notable speed all through the camera technique, which includes the capability to record as much as 7 fps at full-resolution, quickened AF speeds, and full HD 1080p video recording.

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$1,599.00

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Nikon D7100 Digital SLR Camera & 18-140mm VR DX Lens

Best SLR cameras

Compact Camera with Brimming High-end Attributes: Get the most effective of characteristics in this compact Nikon D7100 DSLR Camera. This camera features a massive 24 MP DX-formatcmOS sensor. Capture minute specifics employing the 51-point autofocus program.

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$1,729.95

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Nikon D5300 Digital SLR Camera Body

Best DSLR Camera

Dazzling image fantastic meets modern day day connectivity with built-in Wi-Fi for immediate photo sharing and remote camera handle and built-in GPS with mapping for geotagging and tracking your adventures.

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$1,249.95

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Digital SLR Cameras buyers guide

 

DSLR Cameras are increasingly becoming a type of camera that is in the reach of the average photographer as prices fall and as manufacturers develop more user friendly models.

 

I’ve previously discussed some of the advantages and disadvantages of moving from a point and shoot to DSLR but in this post would like to explore how to choose a DSLR.

 

In doing so I’ll cover:

 

1. 9 Reasons to Upgrade to a DSLR Camera

2. 8 Factors to Consider when Choosing a DSLR

3. My DSLR Camera Recommendations (also check out this post on the Top DSLR Models As voted by our Readers)

 

Firstly, a quick recap on some of the reasons why you might want to upgrade to a DSLR.

 

Reasons to Upgrade to a DSLR Camera

 

Image Quality – Due to the larger size of image sensors in DSLRs which allows for larger pixel sizes – DSLRs are generally able to be used at a faster ISO which will lead to faster shutter speeds and less grain (ie shoot at 1600 ISO on most DSLRs will have less noise than shooting at 1600 on a Point and Shoot). DSLRs also have built in noise-reduction when genearating JPG images which also helps cut down on noise.

 

Adaptability – DSLR’s ability to change lenses opens up a world of possibilities for photographers. While my point and shoot has a nice little 3x Optical Zoom (and many these days have longer ones) my DSLR can be fitted with many high quality lenses ranging from wide angle to super long focal lengths depending upon what I’m photographing (and of course my budget). Add to this a large range of other accessories (flashes, filters etc) and a DSLR can be adapted to many different situations. It should be noted that when it comes to lenses that the diversity in quality of lenses is great. Image quality is impacted greatly by the quality of the lens you use.

 

Speed – DSLR’s are generally pretty fast pieces of machinery when it comes to things like start up, focusing and shutter lag.

 

Optical Viewfinder - due to the reflex mirror DSLR’s are very much a what you see is what you get operation.

 

Large ISO range – this varies between cameras but generally DSLRs offer a wide array of ISO settings which lends itself to their flexibility in shooting in different conditions.

 

Manual Controls – while many point and shoots come with the ability to shoot in manual mode, a DSLR is designed in such a way that it is assumed that the photographer using it will want to control their own settings. While they do come with good auto modes the manual controls are generally built in in such a way that they are at the photographers finger tips as they are shooting.

 

Retaining Value – some argue that a DSLR will hold it’s value longer than a point and shoot. There is probably some truth in this. DSLR models do not get updated quite as often as point and shoot models (which can be updated twice a year at times). The other factor in favor of DSLRs is that the lenses you buy for them are compatible with other camera bodies if you do choose to upgrade later on (as long as you stay with your brand). This means your investment in lenses is not a waste over the years.

 

Digital SLR Camera versus a Compact Digital Camera

 

Digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras are excellent cameras that produce clearer, sharper and more colourful images than most point and shoot digital cameras available. With prices falling rapidly, they are now more affordable then ever. With the price gap between an entry model digital SLR camera and the most expensive compact digital camera narrowing; the question is... do I spend the extra money and get a Digital SLR camera? or save a few hundred dollars and purchase the best digital compact camera.

 

Well, it really depends on your budget; however if you do spend the extra money, here's what you get:

 

In addition to the price falls in the Digital SLR models, the performance on these cameras has increased year on year with the latest Digital SLR cameras being quicker and faster than ever before. They have improved to such an extent that power up or start-up time is near instantaneous with virtually no lag time. "Lag time is the time between you pressing the shutter release button and the camera actually taking the shot". This delay can vary quite a bit between different camera models and it is one of the biggest drawbacks compared to a compact digital camera. The latest digital SLR cameras have virtually no lag times and react in the same way as conventional film cameras, even in burst mode. Compact digital cameras are catching up; however the difference is still significant. A lag time of ~0.5 seconds can result in you missing the heartbeat of the moment and hence that potential great picture.

 

Digital SLR camera also has a larger sensor versus a smaller sensor in a compact digital camera. This equates to higher sensitivity and less noise and results in the camera taking clearer pictures in low light. (They also have better autofocus speed in low light as well). A measure of sensitivity in a digital camera is ISO and a typical ISO range for a Digital SLR camera varies from ISO 100 - 1600 with the latter being more sensitive. The ISO range for a compact digital camera varies from ISO 50 - 400. In summary, the higher the ISO rating, the greater the sensitivity and the better the photo can be taken in low light.

 

The Digital SLR cameras have a much longer battery life due to the limited use of the LCD screen. Please note, that as the LCD screen is only used for viewing the image, the battery life of a digital SLR can allow up to 2000 shots per charge in some cameras compared to 500 for a good point and shoot digital camera.

 

Digital SLR cameras also allow you to interchange lens such as adding a zoom or macro lens when required.

 

On the negative side of a Digital SLR camera; They are usually larger and heavier than compact digital cameras, the image cannot be previewed on the LCD screen prior taking the picture. If you really require the image to be viewed on the LCD prior to taking the picture, there are third party manufacturers that produce LCD screens that attaches to the viewfinder and allow the scene to be view just like a compact digital camera. The other drawback is the inability to take videos and finally, lenses are expensive with the majority costing more than the camera itself.

 

Although compact digital cameras cannot compete on features with a Digital SLR camera, they are great value, have the ability to take videos and are portable.

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