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L.L.Bean Backcountry 3-Person Dome Tent


Cheape 3-Person Dome Tent



Pros

Light weight

Strong

Roomy

Good ventilation

no pole sleeves to rip & tear all clips

good center height I never feel closed in


Cons

Usable cheap stakes

Too bright. Sunlight beams through

No name poles

The screen and door pull strings get caught in zipper



Backcountry 3-Person Dome Tent

 

This rugged four-season backcountry dome tent is designed for winter expeditions yet has all the ventilation needed for warm-weather camping. It's been updated to feature a redesigned vestibule system that's roomier and easier to set up. Its exceptionally strong frame bears a load of snow, stands up to heavy winds and sheds torrential downpours. Tent roof and fly have two outlet vents to increase airflow.

 

Five heavy-duty, shock-corded 7,000-series aluminum poles with color-coded clips for quick setup. Two large doors with breathable no-see-um mesh paneling make it easy to get in and out. Dual vestibules allow you to store wet winter gear outside of the tent – open flaps in dry weather to enhance ventilation. Six large pockets for organizing gear. WeatherWatch window on fly lets in natural light or can be used for stargazing on clear nights. Fly, frame and footprint can be used independently to create a superlight shelter. Imported.

 

- Dimensions  Floor 7'8" x 5'2", 6'9" wide at tent center.

 

- Area  47 sq. ft.

 

- Vestibule area  Front 22 sq. ft., rear 5.8 sq. ft.

 

- Peak ht.  3'11".

 

- Min. wt.  10 lb. 2 oz.

 

- Packed size  24" x 9".

 

1.Exceptionally rugged four-season backcountry tent

 

2.Redesigned vestibule system is roomier and easier to set up

 

3.Built to handle winter conditions and has great ventilation for warmer months

 

Three-person all-season shelters that cost less than $350 and really work are few and far between. And that’s just one reason why our testers love this affordable tent. Price aside, this classically shaped dome is a solid performer, able to fend off drenching rains, light snow, and serious gusts, thanks to a crisscrossing four-pole skeleton with extra-wide pole clips that hold tight and are a cinch to deploy with or without gloves on. Floor space (40 square feet) is ample for three people, and the ceiling height (at almost four feet) is palatial; testers strung wet clothes from the internal guy lines and still had plenty of headroom to sit up for a game of UNO. Two vestibules (16.5 and 10.5 square feet) provide plenty of space for bulky winter gear or protected cooking in a squall. The front vestibule has two doors, which is great for negotiating gear and shifting winds. And the ceiling has closeable vents on both the inner canopy and fly, allowing you to fine-tune venting.

 

No doubt about it, getting up in the morning is tougher in a cold camp without that woodstove to warm things up. But we had the Helios stove set up in the tent vestibule and enjoyed  hot tea and a light breakfast while we were still in the sleeping bags. That makes getting up a lot easier.

 

Once moving, it took us less than an hour to break camp and hit the trail. With “cold” winter camping you can be on the move almost as quickly as  you could in the summertime.  By mid morning we were enjoying a second breakfast in a café.

 

They call it “cold” camping, but if you do it right with the right equipment, it isn’t . . .  Try it yourself sometime.

 

Specifications :-

 

- Dimensions  Floor 7'8" x 5'2", 6'9" wide at tent center.

 

- Area  47 sq. ft.

 

- Vestibule area  Front 22 sq. ft., rear 5.8 sq. ft.

 

- Peak ht.  3'11".

 

- Min. wt.  10 lb. 2 oz.

 

- Packed size  24" x 9".

 

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